The Fleishhacker Pool and the French Concession of Shanghai

San Francisco’s Fleishhacker Pool was built in 1924 by philanthropist and financier Herbert Fleishhacker. Its grand opening was 22 April 1925. The pool was 1,000 x 150 feet (300 x 50 meters), and held 6,500,000 gallons (25,000,000 liters) of heated seawater pumped in from the Pacific Ocean.

Since the pool was so immense (with room for 10,000 people), lifeguards used rowboats. During WWII, it was used for training servicepeople. This was one of the world’s largest pools.

A diving pool was fifteen feet (4.5 meters) deep and fifty square feet (fifteen meters). Both pools heated 2,800 gallons a minute from 60 to 75ºF.

In 1929, it gained a new neighbor, Fleishhacker Zoo (now the San Francisco Zoo).

The grand opening hosted an Amateur Athletic Union swim meet, with 5,000 spectators. One of the swimmers was Johnny Weissmuller, representing the Illinois Athletic Club. Weissmuller returned to Fleishhacker Pool for many future swims, and always drew a crowd.

Other famous swimmers who frequented the pool were Esther Williams and Ann Curtis.

The general opening was 1 May 1925, and drew 5,000 patrons. Adults and teens paid a quarter, while those under age twelve paid fifteen cents. This fee not only allowed them use of the pool, but also a rented swimsuit and large towel (sterilized between uses) and a huge dressing room with showers.

There were also a cafeteria, childcare area, and a tree-lined miniature beach.

Sadly, the pool went into disrepair and decline, and a January 1971 storm was the straw which broke the camel’s back. The repairs cost too much money, and an attempt to convert it to a freshwater pool failed due to uncontrolled algae.

In June 1971, it closed forever.

My characters Nadezhda Lebedeva and Vsevolod Smirnov go to the Fleishhacker Pool during their exhilarating first full day in America in April 1933, after their visit to the Emporium department store. Among their purchases were swimsuits.

Nadezhda, who’s just been released from twelve years in Siberia, can’t remember the last time she went swimming, and Vsevolod, who’s lived his entire life in the small Siberian town of Bulun, has never gone swimming.

It’s been so long since Nadezhda last visited a public bath, she’s forgotten it’s customary to offer rental swimsuits as part of the entry fee. She feels buyer’s remorse for the swimsuit she bought, since that money could’ve been spent on more important things.

Copyright Alan Levine; Source

The French Concession of Shanghai was formed 6 April 1849, in a narrow area around the Old City, south of the British Concession. In 1861, a strip of riverside land east of the Old City was added to enable the building of a dock for French–Chinese shipping.

Starting in the 1860s, “extra-settlement” roads outside the concession began being added.  The first of these roads connected the Old City’s western gate to a Catholic stronghold in Zi-ka-wei (Xujiahui). This enabled French troops to swiftly move between the areas.

In 1899, the concession doubled in size, and in 1913, France gained police and tax powers over the extra roads. In return, France could evict Chinese revolutionaries in this territory. This gave France control over an area fifteen times larger than the original grant.

The French Concession was Shanghai’s most exclusive area by the 1920s. It attracted not only upper-class Chinese and French, but many foreigners. Many luxury apartments were built as the demand for housing grew.

White Russian émigrés brought the Russian population from 41 in 1915 to 7,000 after the Revolution and Civil War. By 1934, it was 8,260. Many Russian employees of the Chinese Eastern Railway fled after the Japanese occupation of northeast China.

Shanghai also became a haven for European Jewish refugees, since it was one of the few places in the world which didn’t require an entry visa or work permit.

Copyright stevechasmar

Just before the outbreak of the Second Sino–Japanese War in 1937, the native Chinese population had grown to 500,000. During WWII, they continued coming to the French Concession to escape the Japanese occupation. They eventually numbered 825,342.

On 30 July 1943, Vichy France handed the French Concession over to the puppet Wang Jingwei government. In February 1946, France gave up all her Chinese concessions.

Avenue Joffre police station; Copyright Fayhoo

My character Inga Savvina defects to the French Concession from Vladivostok in June 1942. Her grandfather and a Navy vice admiral arrange for her to be smuggled onto a Pacific Fleet ship, wearing a nurse’s uniform.

Vice Admiral Agapov handles the Japanese officials at the Huangpo River port, and accompanies Inga a short distance inland. Left on her own, she approaches a non-Chinese couple and speaks to them in the elementary French her grandfather taught her.

She’s taken to Avenue Joffre, where most of the Russians live, and put up in the home of White émigrés who help her gain passage to America to meet the father who has no idea she exists.

Advertisements

The Empress Hotel and The Emporium

Copyright Bobak Ha’Eri, CC-By-SA-3.0

Victoria, British Columbia’s beautiful landmark Empress Hotel (now The Fairmont Empress) was built by British architect Francis Rattenbury from 1904–08 as a terminus hotel for the nearby Canadian Pacific steamship line.

Initially, The Empress served businesspeople and well-off visitors. To accommodate all the patrons, new wings were added from 1909–14 and in 1928. When Canadian Pacific stopped serving Victoria, the hotel remarketed itself as a tourist resort.

Copyright Another Believer

Famous guests include Prince Edward, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (the late Queen Mum), Katharine Hepburn, Douglas Fairbanks, Jack Benny, Rita Hayworth, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Tallulah Bankhead, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Prince Charles and Camilla, and Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko of Japan.

Prince Edward’s waltzing till dawn in the Crystal Ballroom in 1919 was so important to Victorians, elderly women’s obituaries almost fifty years later bore headlines like “Mrs. Thornley-Hall Dies. Prince of Wales Singled Her Out.”

Copyright Another Believer

Most of the 477 rooms overlook the Inner Harbour or the rear courtyard gardens. There are four restaurants—The Veranda, Q at The Empress, Q Bar, and The Lobby Lounge. The lattermost hosts the famous Tea at the Empress, which has run daily in the summer ever since the hotel’s opening on 20 January 1908.

More than 400 people enjoy this classic Victorian-era tea service every day, which features tea sandwiches, a house blend of tea, pastries, scones, quiches, clotted cream, strawberry preserves with lavender from the rooftop garden, mousse, and champagne.

The house tea was first served to King George V in 1914 in Stoke-on-Trent, England, upon the opening of the Booth factory, and the china was first used for the 1939 visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth.

Copyright Bobak Ha’Eri, CC-By-SA-3.0

For many years, there was no sign above the door. As workers raised the sign, a furious man proclaimed, “Anyone who doesn’t know this is The Empress shouldn’t be staying here.”

In 1965, debate was raised about whether The Empress should be torn down to make room for a more modern hotel. Thankfully, this beautiful Edwardian landmark was preserved, and launched a $4 million restoration campaign, “Operation Teacup.”

In 1989, $45 million more were spent on renovations. While new features such as a health club and indoor pool were added, the goal was to restore it to its prewar elegance instead of bequeathing a new image.

Many people report ghostly sightings, such as an early 20th century maid who helps with sixth floor cleaning.

Copyright Brandon Godfrey; Source

My characters Inga Savvina and Yuriy Yeltsin-Tsvetkov go on their first date to Tea at The Empress in August 1947, the day after Yuriy finally confessed he’s been in love with Inga almost since they met five years ago.

Yuriy is so excited to finally be on a date with his dream girl, he almost misses their streetcar stop. He never thought Inga would want to be more than friends, or go out with someone almost five and a half years older.

Yuriy’s family also treats his spinster aunt Zina to tea and supper by The Empress for her 60th birthday.

San Francisco’s Emporium department store opened on Market Street in 1896. For decades, this was a beloved shopping destination, but it sadly closed on its 100th birthday. Today, only the glass dome and façade survive.

In 1896, it was advertised as “the most beautiful store on earth,” with “a grand display of a million-and-a-half dollars worth of all good kinds of merchandise,” fifteen acres of floor space, and a concert by The Emporium Orchestra.

In the gaslight era, The Emporium boasted 10,000 electric lights and its own power plant. Every morning, the store opened with a bugle call, and “improperly-dressed” saleswomen were sent home.

Surprisingly, the 1906 earthquake didn’t damage the building too badly, but the resulting fires destroyed the stock and all the records (accounts receivable among them). That summer, The Emporium set up temporary new digs at Van Ness Avenue.

In 1908, it reopened with a new glass dome 110 feet high. In 1936, it became the city’s first big store to use escalators.

For years, upper-class San Franciscans shunned The Emporium, since it was on the south side of Market Street, a major social dividing line.

After WWII, kiddy rides were installed on the roof during December.

Corporate shakeouts, the proliferation of retail stores, and the bourgeois move to the suburbs all led to The Emporium’s decline.

The Emporium’s restored glass dome in Westfield San Francisco Centre; Copyright http://flickr.com/photos/maveric2003/; Source

My characters Vsevolod Smirnov and Nadezhda Lebedeva shop in The Emporium during their exhilarating first full day in America in April 1933. They buy new clothes and swimwear, and marvel at the modern appliances they never dreamt existed. Nadezhda doesn’t even recognize a modern telephone.

WeWriWa—Svetlana and Kroshka

weekend_writing_warriorsveteransbadge_4

Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. I decided to continue the story of young widower Mr. Lebedev reuniting with his missing daughters, from my first Russian historical, You Cannot Kill a Swan.

It’s now May 1922, in America, and female protagonist Lyuba has fallen unconscious from a very high fever after giving birth to her first child with male protagonist Ivan, about a month premature. A young nursing student and new immigrant, Svetlana, has been coming over to help with the baby, and Kroshka always barks like crazy when she’s there.

Ivan is rocking Fedya at 5:30 when Kroshka comes running into the apartment, right to Svetlana, stirring a pot of beef stew at the coal-burning stove.  This can only mean Mr. Lebedev forget to lock the door when he and his daughters left this morning, and forgot to close the door all the way.

“I’m really sorry for her behavior,” Ivan says as he gets up. “She’s normally so sweet and gentle.  Maybe it’s true that lapdogs have fantasies of being as mighty and powerful as big guard dogs, and this is her way of trying to do just that.  She must sense a stranger’s presence, and wants to protect her friends.”

Kroshka is now jumping at Svetlana’s feet, and won’t stop till Svetlana picks her up.  Once she’s in Svetlana’s arms, she frantically starts licking her face.

The reader has already been introduced to Svetlana, who was sent to Siberia with three of her sisters after the Revolution. In Part II, she was reunited with her cousin Nadezhda, who was captured in Ivan’s place.

Nadezhda told Svetlana her father and five of her sisters escaped to America in the spring of 1921. Nadezhda and her sweetheart Pavel were with them at the port of Tallinn, but weren’t able to get on that ship due to not having tickets. When their enemies found them, Pavel managed to get away on a raft and was picked up by another ship, but it was too late for Nadezhda.

Svetlana’s nursing skills earned her rather decent treatment and an eventual early release. She was unable to obtain Nadezhda’s release along with hers.

Writing about vintage candy (and other sweets)

I’ve always had a major sweet tooth, and love writing scenes with ice-cream, candy, chocolate, sundaes, and baked goods. It’s particularly fun to research vintage candies and sweets, and to create characters with a sweet tooth. My Cinnimin has a particularly intense sweet tooth, and is frequently shown indulging it. Her habit of keeping a bag of candy under her bed and in her purse must’ve been influenced by Claudia in The Baby-Sitters’ Club.

Here are some of the vintage candy ads and dessert recipes I’ve collected, with accompanying excerpts.
Dubble Bubble

1940:

Cinni bought the biggest container of popcorn, along with three chocolate egg creams, ten Goldenberg’s Peanut Chews, a giant rainbow-swirl lolly, and a large bag of Dubble Bubble.  Max and Harry got popcorn, egg creams, and a big bag of Tootsie Rolls.  Sparky could only look at all the wonderful candy and treats, imagining what they must taste like.  This might not be a grand movie palace like she’d gotten used to, but it was hardly some hole in the wall.

Chiffon pie

1940:

Cinni went around to all the baskets of free samples, taking the biggest pieces and digging for crumbs.  A few of the samples were those dreaded, boring, adult sweets like lemon cookies, almond cake, and maple walnut rolls, but almost everything else pleased her palate—thumbprint cookies, chocolate chip bread, blueberry crumb cake, apricot coffeecake, chocolate cookies, cinnamon buns, raspberry bars, hot cross buns, brownies, cupcakes, chocolate éclairs, cherry danishes, fudge, macaroons, meringues, doughnuts, and cookies and cupcakes made to look like cartoon characters and sporting balls.

Strawberry meringue cake

1940:

With the house all to themselves, mostly, Babs and Cinni lay on the living room davenport listening to the radio.  When lunchtime came, Babs went into the kitchen and made them sandwiches with peanut butter, hot fudge, caramel sauce, and marshmallow crème.  She set them on a tray, then added two extra-large glasses of fruit punch with lots of sugar stirred in.

“What are you doing home from school so early?” Mr. Filliard asked when he ran across Babs on her way back to the living room. “I thought I heard the radio in the background, but I assumed it was your mother or aunt, or even that kooky Jasper.”

“Oh, Cinni didn’t feel well, and I took her home.  It’s not a big deal.  She’ll be better by tomorrow.”

“In that case, bring her some sweets.  I won’t hear of my pet child not having her every want catered to when she’s ill.” Mr. Filliard loaded up the tray with fudge, chocolate chip cookies, cherry pie, chocolate doughnuts, and strawberry danishes.

Grape LS

1939:

This is yours,” Barry said, extending a large basket. “I’ve never given mishloach manot to Gentiles before, but everyone in your family deserves one for being so good to us.  Without your father, we’d still be in Europe, with God knows what kind of future.”

Cinni returned the smile and eagerly took the basket.  She headed back to the davenport with it, and delightedly discovered oranges, hamentaschen, saltwater taffy, gumdrops, chocolate-covered peanuts, a bottle of grape pop, and five silver dollars.

“I packed that one just for you,” Barry said, smiling at her again. “I know what a sweet tooth you have.  You’d never be happy with the mishloach manot we made for your parents and siblings.”

Black Crows candy

1938:

Sparky stood back as Cinni, Violet, Tina, and Babs rang the bell and held out their pillowcases.  The woman who answered the door bent down for a large pail of candy and gave each girl a 5th Avenue bar, 3 Musketeers, Tootsie Rolls, and Snickers bars.  Sparky was a little hungry when she saw all the candy they were getting just for putting on costumes and showing up at someone’s house.

GPC vintage

1922:

Ivan comes home to laundry strung through the apartment, the smell of chicken dumpling soup, baby cries, two strangers in his living room, and his fiancée lying unresponsive on the davenport, a cold compress on her forehead.

“Papa, I’m very hungry,” Tatyana announces. “Did you buy me candy after you left work?  I didn’t eat any lunch.”

In a daze, Ivan opens his metal lunchpail and hands her two Goldenberg’s Peanut Chews, with the wrappers open for her convenience. “Can someone care to explain to me what in the world happened today?”

Whitman's 1944

1942:

Yuriy turns into the first ice-cream parlor that appears and finds a green corner booth that almost matches his uniform.  He translates the menu for Inga, and she orders a sundae with chocolate ice-cream, hot fudge, cherries, and crushed candy bars, with an orange egg cream.  Yuriy orders a humbler strawberry ice-cream float.

Orange LS

1933:

Inside the theatre, Vsevolod gets Nadezhda a chocolate ice-cream soda with a cherry and whipped cream on top, and gets himself buttered, salted popcorn.  He wishes he could try all the candy on display to make up for twenty-six years of subsisting on reindeer meat, root vegetables, winter berries, and bread.

Horny Hump Day—Nadya and Pasha

Warning:  Not safe for work or appropriate for those under 18!

Welcome back to Horny Hump Day, a weekly hop where writers share three erotic sentences of a book or WIP. Last week I introduced one of my favorite couples from my Russian historicals, Pavel (Pasha) Teglyov and Nadezhda (Nadya) Lebedeva. They’ve been in love since they were teenagers, but theirs was no ordinary relationship.

The orphaned Nadya turned to prostitution after her uncle was taken away, figuring it wouldn’t be a big deal since her virginity had already been stolen from her. She became the top prostitute at the brothel run by Pasha’s sleazy benefactors, but eventually she and Pasha ran away. While Pasha was able to escape on the Estonian coast and go to America, Nadya was apprehended by her repugnant ex-boss and spent the next 12 years in Siberia.

Finally, in June 1933, at the age of thirty-one, they’ve gotten married. Nadya is looking forward to getting to know what it’s like to experience a loving sexual act for the first time in her life, and has just teased her new husband by asking if he’s just going to look at her all night.

***

He removes his suit as fast as he can without tearing it, deposits it on a chair, heads for the bed, and lustily takes his bride in his arms.  Nadézhda feels a sensation she’s never felt before as he touches her body for the first time, and as she gets acquainted with his body in return.  Now that she’s finally touching and being touched by the man she loves, the sensation is pleasant, exciting, electrical, arousing.