Karla Gets Lost

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This is one of a batch of 20 posts I put together on 24 June 2012 and shuttled into my drafts folder for future installments of the now-permanently-cancelled hop Sweet Saturday Samples. It’s slightly different from the published version in The Twelfth Time, including regarding the absence of the pedantic accent marks.

***

So begins Naina, Katya, and Karla’s journey away from Mrs. Brezhneva’s orphanage, where they’ve lived since February 1920. When I was pulling together the various storylines for the sequel in my head over a decade ago, the unexpected turn of events was envisioned a little bit differently. The basic element that remains is the image of little Karla lost in the snow.

***

The last time Naína, Kátya, and Kárla boarded a train, it was to take them to an orphanage. Today, January 5, 1926, is the first day of the rest of their lives, the first time they’ll be taking a train bringing them one step closer towards freedom. After being seen off at the depot by Mrs. Brézhneva and a delegation consisting of Ínna, Alína, Ohanna, Izabella and her mother, Irína, and Sarah, the three of them check their luggage and board a train heading towards Cherkasi, an old Ukrainian city on the right bank of the Dnipro River. When they reach Cherkasi, the plan is to get another train going to Odessa.

Kárla wishes they had time to stay and take in some of the sights of the famous city, but Naína and Kátya tell her they don’t have that kind of time or money. They’re on a mission to leave the Soviet Union for either Canada or America, whichever accepts them. Acting like tourists would slow down that mission. After they’ve arrived in Odessa and are starting to petition for permission to immigrate, they can look around a bit.

“Don’t get too comfortable,” Naína tells Kárla. “This trip isn’t long enough to merit a sleeping cabin. It’s not like we’re taking a leisurely trip from Kiyev to Paris.”

“Can I still look around while we’re here? I haven’t left the grounds of the orphanage in almost six whole years, and I don’t remember what life was like before we were in orphanages. All I remember is being transported from one orphanage to another, and being kept on orphanage grounds.”

“Go ahead, but make sure to be back by lunch,” Kátya says. “The distance between Kiyev and Cherkasi is about a hundred ninety kilometers and takes a bit under three hours, but that’s not taking into account stopping at other depots along the way. We’ve got a few stops coming. Probably we’ll be in Cherkasi within five hours.”

Naína smiles as Kárla trots off to explore the train. “See you soon,” she waves.

While Naína and Kátya are reading the newspaper and discussing current events, Kárla walks the entire length of the train. Even though this is just an ordinary train and not one transporting first-class passengers, it seems like a paradise on rails after all the cattlecars and goods wagons that took her from orphanage to orphanage. When she gets to the exit door on the caboose, she steps outside and watches the snow-covered Ukrainian landscape going backwards.

After boring of watching the scenery going by in reverse, Kárla climbs up the ladder and starts walking on top of the cars. She’s heard about people walking on top of moving trains, and wants to see if it’s as exciting as it sounds. No one else is walking around on top, so she’s not forced to step aside for anyone else.

Kárla sees a sign indicating the kilometers to Bila Tserkva. She remembers hearing about the history and sights of this historic city in some of the Ukrainian history classes she was forced to take in the orphanage. Perhaps they’ll be able to come back here after they’ve gotten settled into Odessa and are at liberty to explore the land while they’re waiting for their visas.

As the “Welcome to Bila Tserkva” sign comes into view, Kárla loses her balance and slips on a patch on ice on one of the car roofs. No one can hear the screams of an eight-year-old girl falling off the roof of a train going over a mile a minute. She tries to get up after she lands, but she screams again, this time in pain, when she stands on her right leg. Then her throbbing head overtakes her and she falls back down, lapsing into unconsciousness.

Good News at Mrs. Brezhneva’s Orphanage

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This is the second of 20 posts which were originally put together and put into the drafts folder on 24 June 2012, for future installments of the now-long-discontinued Sweet Saturday Samples bloghop. The published version is slightly different, most notably in being stripped of the pedantic accent marks.

Chapter 15 of The Twelfth Time, “Tales Out of Kiyev,” is one of several chapters focused around some of the letters exchanged between Vera and Natalya Lebedeva in New York, their old friend Inessa Zyuganova, who now lives in Minsk with her uncle Dima and several other girls he adopted, and their friend Inna Zhirinovskaya, who’s remained in Kiyev even after reaching age 18, to be an orphanage helper and to study at St. Vladimir University (now Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv).

During the course of the chapter, the sequel’s storyline involving Naina Yezhova, Katya Chernomyrdina, and Karla Gorbachëva starts unfolding. The girls have gotten permission to leave the orphanage in early January 1926, but it’s going to be awhile before they can go to North America, and there’s going to be quite a bump in the road along the way.

***

Mrs. Brézhneva surveys her dining hall in disgust. Some of the Jewish and Christian girls are praying over their food, the religious Jewish girls are complaining the food isn’t kosher, the Muslim girls are protesting they can’t eat pork either, several girls are claiming vegetarianism, and Alína is leading the Georgian girls in clamoring for Georgian food instead of only Russian and Ukrainian fare. Hoping to put their minds on something more productive, she raps on the table. After twenty raps, she finally gains everyone’s attention.

“We have a going-away party to prepare for. Three of our seasoned residents, Kátya Chernomyrdina, Naína Yezhova, and Kárla Gorbachëva, have received permission from both me and the appropriate authorities to leave our wondrous orphanage. They’re going to stay here in the Ukraine until they receive permission to immigrate to America. The going-away party is going to be tomorrow, so you’d all better start making them farewell cards, presents, and meals as soon as you’ve cleared the table.”

“How’d you manage to get the old ape’s permission to leave underage?” Alína asks, smirking triumphantly at Mrs. Brézhneva’s angered facial expression. “Maybe this opens up the door for me to go home to Georgia.”

“I’m eighteen now,” Kátya says. “No one has any legal right to hold me here any longer, and damned if I’m leaving without Naína and Kárla.”

“I guess we have no choice but to immigrate the legal way,” fourteen-year-old Naína says, sighing and rolling her eyes in a very exaggerated fashion. “We’ve always been masters of escape and guile, but we don’t want to start out such an important part of our lives on a lie or crime. If they catch us stowing away on a boat or train, there will be consequences. Even if it means waiting awhile, it’s better than remaining hostages here.”

“How does it feel to hear your inmates describing themselves as hostages, you old gorilla?” Ohanna sneers. “Wondrous orphanage’ my eye.”

“You’re describing me as the gorilla and ape?” Mrs. Brézhneva asks. “Maybe I’m not fit to sit at the Queen of England’s table, but at least I come from a civilized, modern culture, and my alphabet isn’t nightmare-inducing.”

“I believe both Alína and I were referring to your physical appearance and your terrible short haircut, which has always looked like an ape cut it. But since you brought up this subject, the Georgian and Armenian alphabets are beautiful works of art. Your alphabet is pretty damn boring, even if it’s not as bland as the Roman alphabet I’ve seen. And our respective cultures were here and thriving when Russia was still some backwoods trash heap. My people were the first to adopt Christianity, though perhaps in your mind it’s an honor to be part of the first people to abandon all religion.”

“I hope we find my mama in America,” Kárla says. “We don’t think any of our fathers or uncles are still around, but maybe my mother is still here. I don’t know what happened to Naína or Kátya’s mothers, but Naína thinks my mama has the best chance to still be alive and have escaped.”

“Just think, we’ll be going to a real school in America or Canada,” Naína says. “Don’t give me that look, Mrs. Brézhneva. You know full well the excuse of an education we’re getting here doesn’t even compare to an actual school, with trained teachers and real textbooks and homework.”

“I’m glad to wash my hands of you trouble-makers, but don’t fool yourselves into thinking you’ll pick up exactly where you left off before the state stepped in to feed, clothe, house, and educate you.  You only know Russian and Ukrainian. It takes years to get fluent enough in a much different language to keep up with instruction in that language. Although I suppose at least English isn’t as far from Russian as Chinese or Finnish.”

“We’re young. We’ll manage. And Kárla’s only eight. Before long we’ll be masters. But we’re not banking on getting the hell out of this blasted empire as fast as we got permission to beat it out of this hellhole. It takes awhile to get cleared to immigrate, particularly now.”

“I’m hoping they take pity on our sob story,” Kátya says. “And we’re young. Even if America has racist immigration quotas and the Soviet Union isn’t handing out escape passes like candy, I’m sure they’ll let us move up in the line faster because we’re all alone in this world and were raised in orphanages.”

Meet Naina, Katya, and Karla

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I’m returning to moving out old posts indefinitely stored in my drafts folder. Originally one of a batch of 20 posts I put together and stored in my drafts folder for the now-long-defunct Sweet Saturday Samples bloghop on 24 June 2012, this comes from my first Russian historical and has been changed a fair bit. The published version doesn’t use the pedantic accent marks used here, for starts, and some things have been fleshed out while others (like the pointless roll-calling) have been removed. In the published version, sadistic Mrs. Zyuganova also pushes Klara into the snow, not the mud, seeing as it’s December in Minsk.

***

Possibly my favorite subplots in my Russian novels revolve around my orphanage girls. I’d read about how children of “enemies of the people” were treated in orphanages during the Civil War in Felice Holman’s The Wild Children, which I read shortly before beginning the first book in early 1993, but I wasn’t inspired to create a whole series of subplots set in orphanages and playing out over three books till my second major period of working on the first novel.

When I was introduced to what became my favoritest movie, The Inner Circle, in the summer of ’96, and then resumed work on the novel that November [actually September], I knew I had to have orphanage characters too. They include Vera, Natalya, and Fyodora, some of Lyuba’s future stepsisters, and Anya and Leontiy, the children of the couple who took Lyuba and her friends into hiding. Some of the other important orphanage girls include Belarusian Inessa and trio Katya, Naina, and Karla. Naina is the niece of Sonya Gorbachëva, an important secondary character.

Naina and Inessa have always been my favorite of the orphanage girls. Inessa is a very intelligent, headstrong young girl who’s only there because her parents were arrested for an honest, petty mistake, and Naina is as sharp as nails in spite of her young age. Naina first appears in December of 1919, and at barely eight years old is toting a gun.

***

“These three will stay in this bunk to make up for the three who departed.” Mrs. Zyuganova leads three new girls into the quarters. “Names, ages, and nationalities?”

“Naína Antónovna Yezhova, age eight, from Pétrograd.”

“Nice necklace. It’s mine now.” She grabs a citrine necklace hanging around Naína’s neck.

Naína slaps her hands away, reaches under her dress, and pulls a gun on Mrs. Zyuganova. “No it’s not. My mátushka gave it to me when I was four. Steal it and I shoot you. My papa gave me one of his handguns before I was taken away, and I’m not afraid to use it.”

Mrs. Zyuganova struggles to collect herself. “Next?”

“Yekaterína Kárlovna Chernomyrdina, age twelve, from L’viv.”

“L’vov,” Mrs. Zyuganova growls.

“No, it’s really L’viv!”

“Kárla.”

“Last name and patronymic?”

“I’m two and from Yaroslavl.”

“Last name and patronymic?”

“I don’t know!”

Mrs. Zyuganova picks Kárla up and throws her into a wall. Then she begins beating her.

“Stop beating her!” Naína bites Mrs. Zyuganova. “She’s only two years old! She is Kárla Maksímovna Gorbachëva. She’s my cousin, and if you hurt her again I will kill you. Remember, I’ve got a gun, and I know how to shoot. It’s not just for show.”

“Quiet that tiny one down!” Mrs. Zyuganova screams.

Naína takes Kárla into another room.

“No, you can’t leave the room you’re assigned to!”

“I am well accustomed to the rules of orphanages by now. I don’t like you. In fact, I don’t think we’ll be sticking around much longer. Just try to stop us. You know you can always get three fresh victims where you found us.”

Mrs. Zyuganova spits in disgust. “We’re ready to round people up to cars. Boys first. Leontiy Ryudolfovich Godimov, Andréy Samuelovich Bródskiy, Ósip Yuriyevich Khrushchëv, Iósif Vasíliyevich Klykachëv, Maksím…”

They go into the car obediently.

“Girls next. Natálya and Fyodora Ilyínichna Lebedeva, Yeléna Vasíliyevna Klykachëva, Svetlána Yuriyevna Khrushchëva, Valentína L’vóvna Kuchma, Irína Samuelovna Bródskaya, Ínna Aleksándrovna Zhirínovskaya, and Ólga Leonídovna Kérenskaya.”

“My brother is on that transport!” Klára howls.

“Tough luck. If you sneak on I’ll beat you. Oh. I would love to get rid of Inéssa my traitor niece. Off you go!”

“Fédya!  Fédya!” Klára screams.

Mrs. Zyuganova pushes Klára into the mud. “Would anybody like to sell his or her place to little Klára Mikháylovna Nadleshina?”

“I would!  I would!” Inéssa screams.

“Stay on that train, Inéssa! I want to get rid of you!”

Inéssa runs to the man approaching and flings herself into his arms. “Dyadya Díma! Take me away and adopt me! I’ve been in this orphanage since my parents got arrested, and Tyotya Dásha beats me sometimes! Adopt me!”

Mr. Zyuganov’s forehead is thrust forward, like a ram’s. He has red-brown hair and gray eyes. “Dásha, is this true?”

“Yes it’s true, now adopt me, Dyadya Díma!”

“Dásha, I saw him! The Leader! He’s promised to bring fair work conditions to the mines in Belarus! Soon you won’t have to work in this hospital anymore!”

“This isn’t a hospital! It’s a phony orphanage! Adopt me!”

“Of course, I’ll adopt my niece if her parents are jailed enemies of the people—”

Mrs. Zyuganova yanks Inéssa from her uncle’s arms and throws her into the girls’ cattlecar. “Goodbye, my traitor niece. I hope they treat you even worse at the new place.”

Klára runs with the train and boosts herself up into the window. Ánya, Véra, and Natálya run with her and boost themselves up next. They all tumble on top of the three newest arrivals.

“We hid under the baggage holds,” Naína says. “We’re very sneaky. After seeing how she treated Kárla, I had to say no and move onto another orphanage!”

Famous surnames (intentional) in my Russian historicals

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From late ’96 on, any well-known Russian surnames I’ve chosen for characters have been intentional. Not all of these famous names belong to laudatory people, but it’s unrealistic for every single character in any book to have a name untainted by any negative namesakes or associations.

One could read the choice of some of these names on some of these characters as a political allegory of sorts, but that wasn’t really my intention. Certain were chosen in the context of the late Nineties.

Apart from Ivan’s uncle by marriage, Grigoriy Golitsyn, all my former princes’ and nobles’ names  (e.g., Orlov, Obolensky) were deliberately chosen.

Boris N. Yeltsin (1931–2007), http://state.kremlin.ru/president/allbio

Yeltsina, one of my main families, introduced with 13-year-old third sister Lena in 1920. Matriarch Mrs. Yeltsina, who’s run boardinghouses almost her entire adult life, is my oldest character in these books, born in 1866. Lena and her little sister Natalya are an entire generation apart from older sisters Valya and Zina. I have very mixed feelings about their namesake, but ultimately feel he was a decent person who started out trying to do the right thing.

Gorbachëva, Lena’s surrogate mother Sonya, and Sonya’s younger daughter Karla, whom she’s separated from in 1919 and doesn’t see again till 1953. After Karla is separated from her cousin Naina and their friend Katya, she’s adopted by Leonid Savvin and convinced her birth family are enemies of the people. She falls deeply under Stalin’s spell. Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachëv is one of my heroes.

Gennadiy A. Zyuganov (born 1944) 
http://kremlin.ru/events/president/news/19646/photos

Zyuganov(a), one of my main families, introduced through 10-year-old orphanage girl Inessa in December 1919. Her Dyadya (Uncle) Dima adopts her and five of her friends, after already having 27 of his own children. Some of the family later escapes Minsk to begin new lives in the West, but they remain committed Communists and atheists.

Gennadiy Andreyevich Zyuganov came in second in both the 1996 presidential election, and the run-off. If he’d won, Putin (who was left in charge by Yeltsin) might never have come to power, but no, the West just had to meddle and pull Yeltsin’s ratings out of the toilet. God forbid a Communist become president! The current Communist Party of Russia is NOT one and the same as the old one!

Vladimir V. Zhirinovskiy (born 1946), duma.gov.ru

Zhirinovskiy/skaya, Inessa’s dear friend Inna, who becomes co-director of their Kyiv orphanage as an adult, and later defects to Iran along with forty children, ten employees, and the elderly director. Inna’s little brother Vitya becomes Inessa’s second husband. Their namesake runs the arch-conservative Liberal Democratic Party, which is neither liberal nor democratic. 

Chernomyrdina, Naina’s best friend Katya, four years her senior, also the daughter of Sonya’s own best friend. She’s sometimes called Older Katya, to distinguish her from Lyuba and Ivan’s daughter Katya. Viktor Stepanovich Chernomyrdin (1938–2010) was Yeltsin’s Prime Minister, and famous for his malapropisms.

Yezhova, fiesty orphanage girl Naina, who totes a handgun her father gave her before she was taken away. She uses that gun to protect the citrine necklace her mother gave her. She and Katya defect in 1927, and join Sonya in Toronto several months later. Nikolay Ivanovich Yezhov was a total scumbag who played a major role in the Great Terror. Karma came calling when the same fate was delivered to him!

Khrushchëva, orphanage girl Svetlana, who appears in the first two books. Obviously named after Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchëv.

Lebedev(a), one of the main families, introduced through 17-year-old orphaned Nadezhda in 1919. Her uncle Ilya later becomes Lyuba’s stepfather, after several years of having a surrogate father-daughter relationship. Mr. Lebedev has ten daughters by his first marriage. General Aleksandr Ivanovich Lebed (whose surname means “swan”) was the candidate I supported in the 1996 presidential election. He came in third. I was so sad when he was killed in a helicopter crash in 2002!

General Lebed (1950–2002), photo by Mikhail A. Yevstafyev

Kosygina, a teacher at Aleksandrovskiy Gymnasium in the first book and future second prequel. Aleksey Nikolayevich Kosygin was a prominent politician under Khrushchëv and Brezhnev.

To be continued.

Cherkasy, Ukraine

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C

St. Michael’s Cathedral, image by Turzh.

The Cathedral of St. Mykola, image by Вальдимар (Valdymar).

Cherkasy is a city of about 287,500 in Central Ukraine, on the banks of the Dnepro (or Dnipro) River, by the Kremenchuk Reservoir. A nearby epoynymous forest is Ukraine’s largest wooded area. More than 800 different species of flora live in the forest, with 18 endangered.

The city was established in 1286, and recently celebrated its 725th anniversary. It was first mentioned in official records in 1305, during the era of Kyivan Rus. In the 1360s, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Most people who aren’t into history have no idea that Lithuania was a huge empire and European player in this era. In the 15th and 16th centuries, Cherkasy was an epicentre of Cossackdom. Cherkasy became part of the Polish Kingdom in the 1660s, and became part of the Russian Empire after the Second Partition of Poland.

During the Russian Civil War, Cherkasy changed hands between Reds and Whites over 18 times, until it finally went Red for good in 1920. Under Soviet rule, Cherkasy was devastated by the Holodomor (the deliberate Ukrainian famine of 1932-33) and the Great Terror of 1936-8, and then again during the Nazi occupation. Cherkasy was bombed on the first day of Operation Barbarossa, 22 June 1941. In December 1943, it was liberated.

Cherkasy Bridge, image by Вальдимар.

Suborna (Cathedral) Square, image by Вальдимар.

Cherkasy makes a brief appearance in my second Russian historical, The Twelfth Time, in Chapter 15, “More Tales Out of Kyiv.” On 5 January 1926, orphanage girls Naina Yezhova, her cousin Karla Gorbachëva, and their best friend Katya Chernomyrdina get permission to leave Mrs. Brezhneva’s orphanage. Katya recently turned 18, and wouldn’t dream of leaving without Naina and Karla. On the train from Kyiv to Cherkasy, 8-year-old Karla explores the train and ends up walking along the top of the cars. As the train rolls through Bila Tserkva, she falls off, breaks her leg, hits her head, and temporarily falls unconscious.

Naina had already noticed Karla hadn’t come back in a normal time, and she and Katya couldn’t find her after a thorough search. They’re frantic by the time the train pulls into Cherkasy, and they speak to police at the depot. More searches of the train turn up nothing, and they’re forced to continue on to Odessa without Karla. Later on, after they’re in Toronto with Naina’s aunt Sonya, they discover Karla was rescued and adopted, and now believes they’re horrible enemies of the people for leaving the USSR.

Hill of Glory, image by Сергій Криниця (Haidamac) (Sergiy Krynytsya)

Cherkasy has a lot of public parks, including two children’s parks and a park with a zoo. It’s also home to a number of unique museums (such as a museum exclusively devoted to Taras Hryhorovych Shevchenko’s poetry book Kobzar), a puppet theatre, a philharmonic, and many Orthodox and Catholic churches.

The city is well-known for its sculpture festivals. In the Winter, ice sculptures are shown; in the Summer, wooden sculptures are shown and then transferred to various city parks; and in Autumn, stone sculptures.

The Hill of Glory once contained the Cherkasy Fortress, an ancient Russian fort, and the Holy Trinity Church, all of which were destroyed in 1977 to build the Motherland monument on top of the former Castle Hill.

Wedding Palace, Copyright Sergiy Klymenko, from klymenko.data-tec.net and serg-klymenko.narod.ru.

The Shcherbina House, now known as the Wedding Palace, is an amazing example of architecture in Cherkasy. In pre-Revolution days, as Adrian Shcherbina’s mansion, it was the most luxurious, sumptuous building in the city. Under Soviet rule, it had the nickname The Palace of Happiness, due to being the city’s registrar, where many weddings were performed.

More information:

http://www.rada.cherkasy.ua/ua/

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/cherkasy/Cherkassy.research.pdf

http://www.archives.gov.ua/Eng/Archives/ra24.php

http://visitcherkasy.com/en/city/history.html