Happy 50th birthday, GILG!

Image used solely to illustrate subject for the purposes of an album review, and consistent with Fair Use Doctrine

Released January 1969 (sorry, was unable to find the exact date), The Four Seasons’ Genuine Imitation Life Gazette is one of those albums which originally bombed but is now regarded as an absolute masterpiece.

Critics really liked it, but it only sold about 150,000 copies, and the singles did extremely poorly. Four Seasons’ fans were confused, shocked, and angry, since GILG was such a radical departure from their familiar sound.

This was also a time when a great many musical acts who’d been very popular for a long time began falling off the charts. Public tastes were radically changing, and bands like The Four Seasons, The Beach Boys, Herman’s Hermits, and The Dave Clark Five were suddenly considered uncool and irrelevant, even when they tried to evolve with the changing musical landscape.

The psychedelic pop sound, and pop in general, was also on its way out, being replaced by the heavier sounds of bands like Cream, Vanilla Fudge, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Iron Butterfly, and Steppenwolf. Add that to how The Four Seasons weren’t exactly in their early twenties.

GILG just came out at the worst time possible for commercial success. Even if The Four Seasons had looked towards copying the abovementioned bands instead of psychedelic pop, most deejays wouldn’t have played it anyway.

It’s comparable to one of the real reasons many popular silent actors lost popularity in the early sound era. Almost all of them survived the transition just fine, but after the dust began settling, the public came to regard them as embarrassing relics of a bygone age best forgotten.

After this bomb, the band retreated back into a more familiar sound for two last minor hits in 1969, but it was too late. The musical landscape was far too different, their second classic lineup broke up, and their hardcore fans had already moved on. Had GILG done well, The Four Seasons’ Seventies sound might have been so much different.

They had an amazing comeback in 1975, thanks to successfully copying popular sounds at the right time, but their incredible 1978 follow-up unfortunately didn’t do very well, and their 1985 and 1992 albums didn’t chart at all.

Track listing, with stars by the bonus tracks:

“American Crucifixion Resurrection”
“Mrs. Stately’s Garden”
“Look Up Look Over”
“Something’s on Her Mind” (#98 in the U.S.)
“Wall Street Village Day”
“Saturday’s Father” (#103 in the U.S.)
“Genuine Imitation Life”
“Idaho” (#95 in the U.S.)
“Wonder What You’ll Be”
“Soul of a Woman” (one of their most moving songs, celebrating a woman’s entire life from birth till death)
“Watch the Flowers Grow”* (#30 in the U.S.)
“Raven”*
“Will You Love Me Tomorrow”* (#24 in the U.S.)
“Electric Stories”* (#61 in the U.S.)

I obviously highly recommend this album. If you only associate The Four Seasons with songs like “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” and “Let’s Hang On!,” I encourage you to give this album a listen and see the kind of depth and maturity they were capable of, both musically and lyrically.

Happy 35th birthday to Colour by Numbers!

Copyright Virgin Records; image used solely to illustrate subject for the purpose of an album review, and consistent with Fair Use Doctrine

This was one of those albums I got because I saw it in the $2 vinyl stack, and I wanted to indulge my Eighties nostalgia (the same reason I bought Rio in 2007, little dreaming I’d become a Duranie three and a half years later). I ended up really liking this album on its own merits. Unfortunately, the first Culture Club album, Kissing to Be Clever, which I also got in the $2 stacks, didn’t impress me so much.

Their début album may be spotty (with a lot of songs sounding too much alike, too close together), but this their sophomore album absolutely hits it out of the park. It’s a quintessential Eighties album I highly recommend to everyone who loves that decade.

Released October 1983, the album hit #1 in the U.K., Australia, Canada, Japan, and New Zealand; #2 in the U.S., Spain, and Norway; #3 in Sweden and The Netherlands; #4 in France and Switzerland; #6 in West Germany; #9 in Italy; and #17 in Austria.

Track listing, with stars by bonus tracks:

“Karma Chameleon” (one of the most overplayed Eighties songs, right up there with “Hungry Like the Wolf”) (#1 in the U.K., the U.S., Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, Ireland, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland; #2 in both Germanies; #3 in Austria; #4 in Italy; #5 in France)
“It’s a Miracle” (#4 in the U.K.; #13 in the U.S.; Top 5 in Canada)
“Black Money”
“Changing Every Day”
“That’s the Way (I’m Only Trying to Help You)”
“Church of the Poison Mind” (#2 in the U.K. and Ireland; #4 in Australia; #5 in Canada; #9 in Belgium and New Zealand; #10 in the U.S.; #11 in Norway and The Netherlands; #12 in Italy and Austria; #13 in Sweden; #23 in both Germanies; #43 in France)
“Miss Me Blind” (#5 in the U.S. and Canada)
“Mister Man”
“Stormkeeper”
“Victims” (#2 in Ireland and Italy; #3 in the U.K.; #4 in Australia; #7 in New Zealand; #11 in Belgium; #18 in Switzerland; #39 in both Germanies)
“Man-Shake”*
“Mystery Boy”*
“Melting Pot”*
“Colour by Numbers”*
“Romance Revisited”*

Critics by and large loved the album, giving it extremely high ratings. Colour by Numbers has been certified quadruple platinum in the U.S., triple platinum in the U.K., and platinum in Hong Kong; diamond in Canada; and gold in France.

The album is still well-regarded today, both as one of the best albums of the Eighties, and an overall fantastic pop album. It’s hard to pick a favourite song, since they’re all so good!

Happy 50th birthday to The White Album!

The Beatles released their one and only double album on 22 November 1968. Though it’s eponymous, just about everyone has always called it The White Album, due to its plain white cover. Its working title, A Doll’s House, had to be changed when prog-rock band Family released Music in a Doll’s House in July.

This album is known for its solo showcase of each Beatle. Many of the songs weren’t recorded with all four in the studio at the same time, and the distinctive voice and style of each bandmember emerges loud and clear on his respective songs.

Many people know a lot of the songs were written and/or inspired by The Beatles’ sojourn in India. None were released as singles.

The album was recorded from 30 May–14 October 1968, and the sessions were fraught with acrimony. Ringo briefly quit the band in August, feeling like he no longer belonged; producer George Martin took an unexpected leave of absence; engineer Geoff Emerick quit; and John’s new love Yoko famously moved her bed into the studio.

Album one:

“Back in the USSR” (Paul)
“Dear Prudence” (John)
“Glass Onion” (John)
“Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” (Paul) (an immediate skip button, and a song the other three Beatles HATED)
“Wild Honey Pie” (Paul)
“The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill” (John)
“While My Guitar Gently Weeps” (George)
“Happiness Is a Warm Gun” (John)
“Martha My Dear” (Paul) (written about his Old English Sheepdog)
“I’m So Tired” (John)
“Blackbird” (Paul)
“Piggies” (George)
“Rocky Raccoon” (Paul)
“Don’t Pass Me By” (Ringo)
“Why Don’t We Do It on the Road?” (Paul)
“I Will” (Paul)
“Julia” (John)

Album two:

“Birthday” (Paul and John)
“Yer Blues” (John)
“Mother Nature’s Son” (Paul)
“Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey” (John)
“Sexy Sadie” (John)
“Helter Skelter” (Paul) (an obvious outlier he likes to point to as “proof” he was really the hip, hard-edge, avant-garde Beatle)
“Long, Long, Long” (George)
“Revolution No. 1” (John) (never liked the slow tempo)
“Honey Pie” (Paul)
“Savoy Truffle” (George)
“Cry Baby Cry” (John)
“Revolution No. 9” (John) (a sound collage which is famously among fans’ most-hated songs, but which I’ve always adored and often listened to on repeat)
“Good Night” (Ringo) (almost the last song I heard in this lifetime)

There’s also an unlisted song snippet between “Cry Baby Cry” and “Revolution No. 9,” “Can You Take Me Back,” by Paul.

The majority of critics loved it, though a few were less than enthusiastic. It débuted at #1 in the U.K., and spent a total of eight weeks there (seven consecutively). In the U.S., it débuted at #11, shot to #2 the next week, and climbed to #1 in the third week, where it stayed for nine weeks.

The album was also #1 in Australia, Canada, France, Norway, Sweden, Spain, and West Germany.

I’ve always adored this album. My favourite tracks include “Revolution No. 9,” “Glass Onion,” “Dear Prudence,” “Julia,” “Long, Long, Long,” “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey,” and “Savoy Truffle.”

Happy 50th birthday to The Who Sell Out!

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The Who’s third album, released 15 December 1967, came into my own life on 6 December 2000, and is one of my absolute favorites of theirs. They always had a new sound and themes with each album, in spite of the so-called fans who rant and rave about how they dared not do Who’s Next for their entire career.

This, unlike the most overrated album of all time, is a shining example of a consistent concept album. While the concept kind of fizzles out in the middle of the original album, it’s unique and cohesive. The CD remastering improves the concept’s flow.

Sell Out is a spoof of Radio London, a pirate radio station which operated from 23 December 1964–14 August 1967, from a ship anchored in the North Sea. In addition to songs advertising real products, there are also little jingles running between the songs.

The album ended with an instrumental version of a Track Records ad in a locked groove. The CD remastering changed it to a vocal jingle.

Track listing and lead vocals, with stars by bonus tracks:

“Armenia City in the Sky” (using the pronunciation Ar-men-EE-yah, not Ar-MEEN-ee-yah) (written by Speedy Keen and sung by Roger)
“Heinz Baked Beans” (John)
“Mary Anne with the Shaky Hand” (Roger and Pete)
“Odorono” (Pete)
“Tattoo” (Roger)
“Our Love Was” (Pete)
“I Can See for Miles” (Roger)
“I Can’t Reach You” (Pete)
“Medac” (John)
“Relax” (Pete)
“Silas Stingy” (John)
“Sunrise” (Pete)
“Rael” (Roger) (the name of my sixth journal)
“Rael 2” (Pete)*
“Glittering Girl” (Pete)*
“Melancholia” (Pete; famously previously released on Scoop, with the hilarious commentary, “I’m pretty sure The Who never heard this one”)*
“Someone’s Coming” (written by John but sung by Roger)*
“Jaguar” (written by Pete but sung by Keith)*
“Early Morning Cold Taxi” (written and sung by Roger)*
“In the Hall of the Mountain King” (instrumental; written by Edvard Grief)*
“Girl’s Eyes” (Keith)*
“Mary Anne with the Shaky Hand” (U.S. Mirasound version)*
“Glow Girl” (Roger and Pete)*

The album reached #13 in the U.K., and #48 in the U.S. “I Can See for Miles” reached #10 in the U.K., and #9 in the U.S. This was their only Top 10 song in the U.S., and the first Who song I was consciously aware of hearing, back in ’93. Since they were an active band till I was three, I probably heard them on the radio, but “ICSFM” was the first I specifically remember hearing.

My favorite songs are “ICSFM,” “Sunrise” (which a lot of guy fans hate and bash), “Our Love Was,” “I Can’t Reach You,” “Rael,” “Rael 2,” “Glow Girl,” “Tattoo,” and “Silas Stingy.”

Back in the days of Yahoogroups, the main estrogen Who list was called Glow Girls. It contains the genesis of Tommy, with the music that became “Sparks” and “Underture,” and the outro verse “It’s a girl, Mrs. Walker, it’s a girl,” as the girl in the song dies in a horrific plane crash and is reincarnated. “[O]nly of course Tommy was a dear little boy.”

Many people have seen parallels between “Rael” and Israel, both because 1967 was the year of the Six-Day War, and lines like:

“My heritage is threatened/My roots are torn and cornered”
“Rael, the home of my religion/To me the centre of the Earth”
“The country of my fathers/A proud land of old order/Like a goldfish being swallowed by a whale”

The album has received many positive reviews, both then and now, and is widely considered one of The Who’s very best. Interestingly, Roger only sang lead on five of the original tracks, the same number as Pete. Roger still didn’t have the greatest range or vocal confidence yet. Touring Tommy all over the world was what turned him into a vocal powerhouse.

I highly recommend this album!

Happy 50th birthday, Evolution!

Copyright Parlophone; image used solely to illustrate subject for the purposes of an album review, and consistent with Fair Use Doctrine

Evolution, released 1 June 1967, was the first of two Hollies’ albums to come out in 1967. It was recorded from 11 January–17 March 1967, and is a classic of the psychedelic era. People who perpetuate the myth that The Hollies only did lightweight pop haven’t listened to this album!

The Hollies were always less popular here across the pond than they were in their native U.K., which adds to the lack of familiarity many people may have with it. Of course, there’s also blame to be laid at a certain former bandmember who couldn’t stop talking about how he left because he got too cool for his band.

It reached #13 in the U.K., and is composed entirely of songs written by Allan Clarke (lead singer), Tony Hicks (lead guitarist), and Graham Nash (rhythm guitarist). In addition to serving as the band’s songwriting team, these three also provided their famous harmonies.

Psychedelic photographer Karl Ferris took the photo used on the cover, with the artwork created by The Fool, a Dutch design collective and band. It depicts The Hollies breaking through a membrane to get away from their pop sound into the psychedelic world. They’re pushing into a new musical style and level of consciousness.

Track listing:

“Then the Heartaches Began”
“Stop Right There”
“Water on the Brain”
“Lullaby to Tim” (written for Allan’s firstborn child)
“Have You Ever Loved Somebody?”
“You Need Love”
“Rain on the Window”
“Heading for a Fall”
“Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe”
“When Your Light’s Turned On”
“Leave Me”
“The Games We Play”

The U.S. repackaging, while keeping the title, put the tracks in a different order, remixed everything with heavy echo and reverb, included the single “Carrie-Anne” (the source of my pen name) as the lead-off track, and left off “Water on the Brain,” “Leave Me,” and “When Your Light’s Turned On.”

The U.S. record company also didn’t use The Fool’s overall cover design, wanting the artform to be more consistent with the U.S. psychedelic style. This was The Hollies’ début for their new U.S. record label, Epic.

None of the songs were released as singles in the U.K., and the U.S. only released “Carrie-Anne” (not an original album track) as a single.

My favorite tracks are “Have You Ever Loved Somebody?,” “Then the Heartaches Began,” “Leave Me,” and “Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe.” I highly recommend this if you’re interested in getting to know The Hollies beyond their most overplayed songs.