Happy 50th birthday, Butterfly!

Copyright Parlophone; image used solely to illustrate the subject for the purposes of an album review, and consistent with Fair Use Doctrine

Released 1 November 1967, Butterfly was The Hollies’ seventh album, and my own personal favorite of the Graham Nash era. It also might be my overall favorite, it’s that damn good. I love the psychedelic sound.

This was their third album in a row to be composed entirely of songs by Allan Clarke (lead singer), Tony Hicks (lead guitarist), and Graham Nash (rhythm guitarist).

As with their earlier 1967 release Evolution, none of the songs were released as singles in the U.K., though in the U.S., the lead-off track “Dear Eloise” reached #50. “Try It” was the U.S. B-side of “Jennifer Eccles,” and “Elevated Observations” was the B-side of “Do the Best You Can.”

Track listing:

“Dear Eloise” (for which an early music video, in black and white, was made)
“Away Away Away”
“Maker” (features a sitar)
“Pegasus” (one of the rare times Tony sings lead)
“Would You Believe?”
“Wishyouawish”
“Postcard” (no relation to The Who’s later song by the same name)
“Charlie and Fred”
“Try It”
“Elevated Observations”
“Step Inside”
“Butterfly”

The U.S. and Canadian repackaging, released 27 November 1967, was retitled Dear Eloise/King Midas in Reverse, and used entirely different cover art. It added the single “King Midas in Reverse” and the Evolution track “Leave Me.” Missing from this edition were “Try It,” “Pegasus,” and “Elevated Observations.”

My favorite tracks are “Maker,” “Elevated Observations,” “Would You Believe?,” and “Dear Eloise,” though the entire album is fantastic. The band is in top form, at the height of their creative powers in the Graham Nash era.

People who think The Hollies only made lightweight pop need to listen to this album! They evolved into a new musical style and tried new things, even if you’d never know it from the 4-5 songs left in regular rotation on the average oldies station. This is NOT “I love you, you love me, ooh baby” pablum.

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