WeWriWa—Discussing religion

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. The rules have now been relaxed to allow a few more sentences if merited, so long as they’re clearly indicated, to avoid the creative punctuation many of us have used to stay within the limit.

I’m now sharing snippets from the book formerly known as The Very Next, now entitled Movements in the Symphony of 1939. It was released in e-book format on March second, with a paperback edition to follow within a few months. The paperback edition will have a different cover.

Best friends Cinnimin and Sparky (real name Katherine) have been forced to take new houseguest Samantha to their friend Quintina’s birthday party, despite Sam’s out of place clothes and lack of a present. During their short walk there, Sam revealed a fear of her mother and mentioned her parents have different religions. Now Sam starts revealing her commitment to fundamentalism.

“Your parents are different religions? What is your dad, Catholic or something? I don’t think he’s Jewish, given how upset you and your mom got when you found out Sparky’s family’s Jewish.”

“We’re all Methodists, but my dad is a regular Methodist who only had one baptism. My mother and I are fundamentalist Methodists with three baptisms. We go to a regular Methodist church, but we have our own beliefs and practices to set us apart. Maybe someday my father will see the light and join us in the one true church.”

“What did you need three baptisms for? I didn’t think you needed to get rebaptized if you joined a different church. The original baptism counts for all Christian churches, so long as it’s a real church.”

The ten lines end here. A few more to complete the scene follow.

“That’s a long story. Our minister in D.C. explained how our first baptism was invalid, since it wasn’t in a fundamentalist church. He had to baptize us twice more each.”

Cinni shifted her weight to her other foot. “So you both used to be normal, and weren’t always super-religious?”

“We used to be more like other people, yes. You probably guessed my mother was really young when I was born. She wasn’t married either, but at least she eventually was able to marry my father. Their parents disapproved of their relationship. I think my mother became so overly religious to try to atone for how sinful she was before. Now it’s hard to imagine living any other way, though our salvation only happened a few years ago.”

WeWriWa—On the way to the party

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. The rules have now been relaxed to allow a few more sentences if merited, so long as they’re clearly indicated, to avoid the creative punctuation many of us have used to stay within the limit.

I’m now sharing snippets from the book formerly known as The Very Next, now entitled Movements in the Symphony of 1939. It was released in e-book format on March second, with a paperback edition to follow within a few months. The paperback edition will have a different cover.

Best friends Cinnimin and Sparky (real name Katherine) have been forced to take new houseguest Samantha to their friend Quintina’s birthday party. Sam’s mother Urma insisted so vociferously and stridently, even against the objections of her husband, Cinni, and Sam herself on account of Sam’s out of place clothes and lack of a present.

Sam followed after Cinni and Sparky, trailing several feet behind. She didn’t make any conversation as they walked through the large backyard. Sam held back from the low wooden fence which Cinni and Sparky straddled before heading up the unpaved walkway to the Holidays’ house. First she looked around for any other way to negotiate the final leg of the journey, then back at the Filliards’ house.

“Do you see my mother watching from any windows or the back door?”

“I don’t see her,” Cinni said. “What, will she beat you or yell at you if you straddle the fence? Or does she think boys are going to see up that long dress of yours if you climb over?”

The eight lines end here. A few more to complete the scene follow.

“I can never be too careful around my mother. But please don’t tell her I told you that. You don’t want to know what kind of woman my mother is.” Sam carefully climbed up and swung her leg around to the other side of the fence, climbing down just as slowly and carefully.

“It’s easier to climb fences with shorter skirts. I wish it were more acceptable for girls to wear pants, but sometimes you gotta pick your battles. Would your mother let you wear more modern clothes? That looks like something my mother mighta worn when she was our age, and she was born in 1900.”

“It’s fine. I’m used to having to dress like this. I can’t go against my mother. My father gets it every time he tries to do what he wants, and I’d get it even worse, since I don’t have the excuse of being a different religion.”

WeWriWa—Forced to bring a guest

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. The rules have now been relaxed to allow a few more sentences if merited, so long as they’re clearly indicated, to avoid the creative punctuation many of us have used to stay within the limit.

I’m now sharing snippets from the book formerly known as The Very Next, now entitled Movements in the Symphony of 1939. It was released in e-book format on March second, with a paperback edition to follow within a few months. The paperback edition will have a different cover.

Best friends Cinnimin and Sparky (real name Katherine) were on their way to their friend Quintina’s birthday party when new houseguest Urma Smart demanded they take her daughter Samantha. Urma began very angry when Cinni compared Sam’s very old-fashioned clothes to those of the Amish. In Urma’s mind, the Amish are heretics.

Last week, when I forgot to sign up, Urma’s husband Mortez attempted to come to Cinni’s defense and was quickly cowed into submission by Urma. Though Mortez may be henpecked, he’s not as passive and stupid as he might seem.

“Well, are you taking Samantha or not?” Urma asked, in the same acid-edged voice. “We don’t have all day to wait!”

Cinni shrugged. “Sure, she can tag along, but don’t expect her to be instantly popular. She has to prove herself before I’ll admit her to our popularity ranks. If she ain’t got what it takes, she’ll have to be a Nobody. Sam, do you have anything to bring to Tina? It’s pretty rude to come empty-handed to a birthday party.”

“I didn’t know there was a birthday party today,” Sam said. “I’d be insulted if I was the birthday girl and a surprise guest got me something cheap and last-minute.”

The ten lines end here. A few more to complete the section follow.

“Enough stalling!” Urma shouted. “Just go to the party! Samantha can become friends with your friends later, but for now, she just needs to get introduced to them.”

WeWriWa—Meet Mortez

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. The rules have now been relaxed to allow a few more sentences if merited, so long as they’re clearly indicated, to avoid the creative punctuation many of us have used to stay within the limit.

I’m now sharing snippets from the book formerly known as The Very Next, now entitled Movements in the Symphony of 1939. It was released in e-book format on March second, with a paperback edition to follow within a few months. The paperback edition will have a different cover.

Best friends Cinnimin and Sparky (real name Katherine) were on their way to their friend Quintina’s birthday party when new houseguest Urma Smart demanded they take her daughter Samantha. Urma began very angry when Cinni compared Sam’s very old-fashioned clothes to those of the Amish. In Urma’s mind, the Amish are heretics.

Mortez, Urma’s dark-haired, dark-eyed husband, looked up from Life magazine and began to stand up from the blue loveseat. “Urma, you’re not acting very Christian right now. You shouldn’t yell at a young girl and accuse her of things she never suggested because you read between non-existent lines. Samantha does dress a little out of fashion, and no one will know her at that birthday party. I agree she does need new friends, but you can’t force Cinnimin to bring her along.”

Urma glared at her husband, whom Cinni saw shrinking under her gaze. “Was anyone speaking to you?”

“No.”

“Then kindly go back to reading and staying out of matters that don’t concern you. I did not go to so much trouble to win you back and marry you, against my parents’ wishes, just for you to dictate how I should and shouldn’t behave.”

The ten lines end there. A few more to finish the scene follow.

“Yes, my love.” Mortez sat back down and continued reading Life.

Cinni stared at Mortez. “Well, now we know who wears the pants in that marriage,” she whispered to Sparky. “I don’t think the man is the head of the household and superior to his wife, but he should have a backbone and not let his wife boss him around like that. Even Mrs. Seward ain’t that mean and cold to Mr. Seward when they fight.”

WeWriWa—Intercepted by Urma

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. The rules have now been relaxed to allow a few more sentences if merited, so long as they’re clearly indicated, to avoid the creative punctuation many of us have used to stay within the limit.

I’m now sharing snippets from the book formerly known as The Very Next, the chronological second of my Atlantic City books, set from March 1939 to the dawn of 1940. It underwent a radical rewrite in 2015, and I recently completed the fourth and final version. I plan on an early March release. The new title will be revealed then.

Chapter 2, “Happy Birthday, Tina,” starts when best friends Cinnimin and Sparky (real name Katherine), who live together, are about to head out to their friend Quintina’s birthday party. Then new houseguest Urma Smart sees them and delays them on their way.

An eruv is a fence, wall, or other enclosure enabling people to carry objects and push strollers in the public domain on the Sabbath. I used to live within the eruv of Albany, NY.

Saturday after lunch with her family, Sparky put on her new Mary Janes and got ready to head out to Quintina Holiday’s residence. Since there was no eruv or other type of continuous, unbroken fence, Cinni carried both of their birthday presents for Tina.

“Where are you going without Samantha?” Urma demanded.

“One of our best friends is having a birthday party,” Cinni said. “She lives behind our house. Sam wasn’t invited. No one there will know her.”

“So? You should take Samantha. She needs playmates, however secular.”

The ten lines end there. A few more to finish the scene follow.

Cinni looked at Sam, wearing a navy blue sailor suit dress, matching giant hairbow, and black button-up boots, her long blonde hair combed straighter than a pin. “I don’t think she’ll be very popular at the party. No one there dresses like the Amish.”

“Amish?” Urma’s voice took on a sharp, ugly, accusatory edge. “Is that what you think we are? I’ll have you know we’re proper Christians, and wouldn’t dream of joining heretical groups like that! We’re such good Christians, we’ve had three baptisms! How dare you accuse us of heresy!”