Yesterday I celebrated the release of Journey Through a Dark Forest: Lyuba and Ivan in the Age of Anxiety, my third Russian historical. Since I was only able to bring the length down to 861K (from 891K), I made the decision to release it in four volumes.

Not only were many classic saga-length novels released in multiple volumes, but it miraculously, perfectly worked out so each of the four Parts reads much like its own self-contained story, with a focus on different characters and storylines. There’s no sense of ending in media res.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to visit Iran for firsthand research for the final version. The Iranian chapters and sections of Dark Forest will have to remain based on secondhand research, and my happy memories of my family’s Iranian friends when I was growing up.

I still plan to visit Iran someday, and I’m still completely unafraid. It’s a beautiful country, and the vast majority of her people are nothing like the media stereotypes them. They want peace and democracy, not a totalitarian theocracy. Many people don’t realise Iran was an extremely modern, Westernised country till 1979.

Part II is set from 15 January 1937–1 September 1939.

While the whole world is in the throes of one of the most concentrated periods of Sturm und Drang in recent memory, the Konevs and their friends far and wide struggle to survive and make their way back to some semblance of a peaceful, ordinary world.

The Konevs’ close-knit family bond is torn asunder when Tatyana finally discovers the truth about her paternity on the eve of her eighteenth birthday. She believes Boris’s self-serving, selectively-reported version of events, and wants nothing further to do with Ivan. As soon as she graduates high school and becomes a Barnard student, she moves in with Boris, who now lives in Harlem and operates a jewelry store. In order to keep an eye on the situation and make sure Tatyana is safe, Nikolay moves into the third bedroom. But the truth about Boris eventually starts catching up with Tatyana, and Boris’s latest schemes threaten to lead to his umpteenth undoing.

Meanwhile, in the USSR, the Savvins, the Zyuganovs, the Godunov cousins, and several now-adult former orphanage girls are betrayed by the Revolution and sucked into the terrifying whirlwind of the Great Terror. Leonid and Georgiya are arrested for violating the infamous Article 58 in various ways, while Inessa is left a young widow with going on three children and fights against the clock to get her family out of harm’s way and to their old friends the Lebedevas in America.

In addition to her own children, Inessa has also been given her old friend Inna’s baby nephew Damir for wetnursing and safekeeping while his father arranges for Inna, the elderly Mrs. Brezhneva, and some of the orphanage children and employees to get out of Kyiv. Inna’s group ends up in Isfahan, Iran, the same place her old friends Alina, Ohanna, and Izabella have fled to with their remaining families. Iran represents an entirely new world, unlike anything they’re used to, but it’s a welcoming haven for the dispossessed. The life Inna and her friends create for themselves in Iran isn’t always an easy life, but it’s a much better life than the one they fled from.

And back in America, Tatyana, Nikolay, and their new friends are enjoying being young, carefree, and in love, even as storm clouds gather on the horizon and threaten to tear apart the world of tomorrow they’re so excited to step into. But whatever lies ahead in the uncharted world of tomorrow, and however many shocks, struggles, and adjustments it may entail, change has always been a part of life. To be born or create something new, one must first destroy the pre-existing world, for better or worse.

2 thoughts on “The Right Path Appears Not Anywhere

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