WeWriWa—How it should’ve ended

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. I’ve been sharing from my alternative history, And Aleksey Lived, which released 17 July, on my primary protagonist’s real-life 100th death anniversary. Once I’ve earned enough money from sales, I’ll use some of it to make donations to the National Hemophilia Foundation and the National Hemophilia Federation, in memory of Aleksey.

This will be the last sample I’ll share from this book for awhile. These are the final lines, from the second section of the short Epilogue. Like the end of the main text of my magnum opus Cinnimin, it’s also based on the wording of Deuteronomy 34, the final chapter of the Torah. Those final paragraphs always give me goosebumps.

The time had come for Aleksey to die.  He was one hundred years old at the time of his death, his eyesight undimmed, his mind as sharp as ever, his intellect unabated, his overwhelming sense of compassion as strong as it’d been throughout his whole life.  He and his belovèd Arkadiya breathed their last breaths together, holding hands.  Just as Arkadiya had always promised, she’d made it to one hundred seven to ensure Aleksey survived a full century.

The Imperial Family bewailed their passing for forty days and forty nights, in keeping with Russian Orthodox tradition, unable to believe the couple who’d led their empire for so many decades was suddenly no more.

The period of mourning for Aleksey and Arkadiya came to an end.  Following the period of mourning, Yarik was coronated.  Now Yarik was filled with the spirit of wisdom and compassion, because of the lifelong example he’d gotten from his parents; and since he was cut from the same cloth as his father, the people of Russia heeded him and did as he said.

Never again did there arise a leader like Tsar Aleksey II, called Tsar Aleksey the Savior, who was the most compassionate, intelligent, humane, enlightened Tsar who ever lived; lived through ten decades of history; survived longer than any other hemophiliac; who was snatched from certain Death the month before his fourteenth birthday by a last-minute miracle; and who demonstrated a powerful harnessing of might and compassion before all the peoples of the world.

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10 thoughts on “WeWriWa—How it should’ve ended

  1. Wow.

    A hundred years of Aleksey and his life.

    He really did have it all – his mind; his intellect; his eyes and his compassion.

    And Arkadiya kept her promise.

    Reminds me a lot of John Paul the Great.

    [Other non-royal haemophiliacs seem to have normal lifespans now or very close to].

    Again, Aleksey sets a high bar.

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  2. Oh…so sad, yet so beautiful.

    This story is bittersweet. I wish he’d lived and turned out to be the wise and compassionate leader your re-imagined history has made him. 🙂

    Congrats on the release!

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  3. Ok, WOW. Just bowled over by the way you ended their story, very touching. It would have been so great if the real Aleksey had had a chance to show what he could do but in your alternate history we certainly get a sense and a feel for the possibilities. Really well done excerpt (as with all the previous ones you shared – this story stays on the reader’s mind)..

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