WeWriWa—The doctor arrives

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. This week’s snippet comes a bit after last week’s, when 18-year-old Emánuel and 17-year-old Adrián were given olive oil to protectively coat their malnourished stomachs before eating anything.

The rescuing Czech partisans have introduced themselves, and Emánuel asked if there were any violins hanging around. Emánuel hasn’t played his instrument in eight months, and is longing to reconnect with his life’s greatest passion. The partisans have told him they don’t have any violins for him.

By lantern light, the doctor unwound Adrián’s bandage, which had become rather soaked with blood.  The wound was no longer gushing, though it was still steadily bleeding.

“I’ll help him out of his clothes,” Emánuel volunteered. “Don’t worry, I’ll cover you with a sheet, haver.”

Adrián closed his eyes as Emánuel maneuvered him out of his coat, shirt, boots, and trousers.  Mercifully, Emánuel covered him with a blanket, leaving only the bleeding shoulder and affected part of the outer thigh visible.

“My name is Dr. Svoboda,” the doctor said as he poured saline over each wound in turn. “My, that bullet took a nice chunk of flesh off your shoulder.”

“Just pull it out!” Adrián howled.

U.S. Army medic (45th Infantry Division) and captured Wehrmacht medic working together on a wounded German soldier, 6 February 1944, Anzio, Italy

Svoboda means “freedom” in many of the Slavic languages. Haver means “friend” in Hungarian, one of many Hungarian words taken from Hebrew and Yiddish. The Hebrew word for friend is chaver.

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11 comments on “WeWriWa—The doctor arrives

  1. He’s getting the best care available at the moment though. You always provide the necessary gritty details to make the scene so real…

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  2. I like Dr. Svoboda (and the note on the name). My dad was a medic in WWII–liberator in the concentraton camps. Great details!

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  3. Author Jessica E. Subject says:

    A great scene! Lucky they have come into such great care considering the circumstances. I hope they no longer have anything to worry about.

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  4. P.T. Wyant says:

    I’d probably be howling too… I understand the necessity, but oooh… that has to burn and sting and other unpleasant sensations.

    Love the photo of the two enemies working together.

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  5. nancygideon says:

    Such calm humanity in the midst of such misery. Great Scene, Carrie Anne.

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  6. Jenna Jaxon says:

    I hope they are in time and too much infection hadn’t set in. Infection generally kills as many if not more than bullets do! Very realistic scene.

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  7. Oh, dear. Sounds like he’s losing an awful lot of blood!

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  8. Yikes, doctors in WWII had rough jobs. Great snippet though!

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  9. I shudder at the thought. So glad we have some conveniences today. Of course, the man with the bullet in his shoulder might not think as much of them…

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  10. Ed Hoornaert says:

    Powerful scene. I have the feeling he may not make it.

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  11. Diane Burton says:

    How fortunate they came upon friendly people. I love the little bits of info you add to your posts.

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