WeWriWa—A new kind of atonement

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Welcome back to Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday, weekly Sunday hops where writers share 8–10 sentences from a book or WIP. This week’s snippet comes from my WIP, The Strongest Branches of Uprooted Trees, and is the conclusion of the first section of Chapter 29, “A New Kind of Atonement.”

It’s September 1945, and my characters have recently moved to Budapest from Abony so they can be in a much larger Jewish community. They’re attending services at the Great Synagogue of Budapest on Dohány Utca (Street), in the uniquely Hungarian Neolog denomination. It’s sort of like liberal Modern Orthodoxy or very, very old-school Conservative Judaism.

Parts of the synagogue are in ruins (along with 80% of the entire city), and about 2,000 people who died in the Budapest Ghetto are buried in the courtyard. There’s also the chilling knowledge that during the occupation, Eichmann had his office in the women’s gallery. Needless to say, the autumn holidays haven’t been very happy so far.

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Dohány Utca Synagogue, Copyright Gabor Dvornik

The sounds of Kol Nidre commingled and competed with the sobs and shrieks they’d come to expect here.  Beyond remembering all the people who’d been with them last year at this time, surely many people were thinking of the promises, vows, and oaths they’d made in the best of faith but been unable to keep because of the forces of evil.

Eszter thought back to one of the film festivals she’d gone to with Mirjam, before the war, when foreign films were still allowed.  The climactic Yom Kippur scene from The Jazz Singer came into her head, as Al Jolson’s character chose his faith over his career, at least for that one night.  He sang with a tear in his voice, his soul and identity laid bare, in spite of his attempts to hide behind blackface and a de-Judaized name.

Perhaps Kálmán was right, and they’d be better-off in their own homeland, without having to resort to similar hiding measures and make the Gentiles think they were better, different, more modern than those people who lived in self-imposed ghettos.  The cataclysm they’d just lived through had struck everyone, the insular as well as assimilated.  Now it was up to them to rebuild the remnants and replant the uprooted trees.

Next autumn, I’ll be doing a series on The Jazz Singer at 90, exploring a lot of different topics related to the film, the transition from silent to sound film, and so much more. I’m really looking forward to researching and writing this series.

Halloween-themed posts begin next week!

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11 comments on “WeWriWa—A new kind of atonement

  1. Ed Hoornaert says:

    Interesting snippet.

    Like

  2. Author Jessica E. Subject says:

    A lot of emotion in this snippet.

    Like

  3. Very moving, and I really enjoyed the movie clip.

    Like

  4. siobhanmuir says:

    A hard time and a question that’s timeless. Where do you go and how do you continue? Great snippet, Carrie-anne.

    Like

  5. P.T. Wyant says:

    Interesting snippet. How much of yourself do you hide to fit in?

    Like

  6. Wow–very powerful snippet. I remember watching The Jazz Singer.

    Like

  7. Jenna Jaxon says:

    I love these snippets that give me a look at topics I’d never have found otherwise. And, I am sorry to say, I’ve never seen The Jazz Singer. I need to remedy that.

    Like

  8. It’s tough to be a survivor–you have to decide how to live with the past, and that’s different for everyone.

    Like

  9. Wonderful snippet. Very interesting video as well. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  10. Karen Michelle Nutt says:

    Interesting snippet as usual.

    Like

  11. You’ve got some intense emotion in this one. I love the feel of an inner war to either fit in or be yourself. The line about the singing was perfect. Very interesting.

    Like

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